Intrapreneurship Conference 2015 http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com The premier global event for corporate entrepreneurs, innovation managers and experts to learn the best and next practices for implementing and scaling intrapreneurship Tue, 14 Apr 2015 08:37:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 The Innovation Family – A Basics Guide to Channel Innovative Rebellion http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/the-innovation-family-a-basics-guide-to-channel-innovative-rebellion/ http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/the-innovation-family-a-basics-guide-to-channel-innovative-rebellion/#comments Mon, 13 Apr 2015 08:20:02 +0000 http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/?p=3229 Innovation an parenting have much more in common than you might expect. They both seem simple for outsiders, but everyone involved in either or both fields know it’s far from easy. Success is determined by getting the basics right, continuous nurturing and the will to develop an understanding of the complexity at hand. This is...

Read More

The post The Innovation Family – A Basics Guide to Channel Innovative Rebellion appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
Dr. Fred van Ommen

Dr. Fred van Ommen

Corina Kuiper

Corina Kuiper

Innovation an parenting have much more in common than you might expect. They both seem simple for outsiders, but everyone involved in either or both fields know it’s far from easy. Success is determined by getting the basics right, continuous nurturing and the will to develop an understanding of the complexity at hand.

This is the simple but compelling argument Corina Kuiper and Fred van Ommen made. It has been the foundation for their strategy consulting firm The Innovation Family, which offers interim management as well as hands-on support, coaching and workshops/training. We asked Corina and Fred, who together have over 50 years of innovation management and coaching experience, to explain how such parenting indeed fits well to principles as corporate venturing, business development and post-merger integration.

C

orina and Fred, you compare corporate venturing with parenting. Why is that?

Startups in corporate organizations have all the characteristics of babies and teenagers in families, whereas the corporate behaves like a ‘parent’ or even a ‘grandparent’, and new ideas or innovations are the babies or teenagers. The parents want to protect and leverage their existing business but they also realize that the need to have new children is to safeguard the future of the family.

However raising children is not easy because these children want to experiment and define their own future. As parent you need to find the right balance between challenging and protecting them. That’s exactly what we try to explain to our clients or anyone interested for that matter; children need to be protected but given the space to venture into new realms and explore at the same time.

T

here is no single rule for successful parenting, but sometimes parents would really just like a handbook with simple steps to follow. I guess corporate venturing professionals feel the same. What’s your best advice for them?

Indeed there is no detailed step-by-step plan. Each family and also each company is different. However understanding why and how parents and children are different and what drives their behavior is important. As a company you need first to recognize your teenagers as they often (try to) behave like adults. The next step is to accept that parents and teenagers are different.

You need to be patient. You have to strike a balance between what these teenagers have to borrow from the parent and which things you allow them to forget. Although there is no handbook for parenting or for innovation, there are tips and tricks. As with parenting, you don’t ‘just do it’. You take advice from family and friends to raise and nurture your children in order to help them achieve their potential. We will share our tips and tricks in our session. Teenagers should think big, act small and accelerate fast.

C

an you share an example of a „successful” corporate parent and teenager relationship? In what way is it a success; what do you measure?

DSM is a company that has renewed itself a number of times (from coal mining to oil based products to bio-based products and nutrition). They apply all different instruments of venturing, internal, external with startups and VCs. In a way, you could say that the yardstick is how many times you have tried to challenge, change or acknowledge that the current strategy you’re applying is not yielding the maximum gains you’d want to.

Their youngsters are managed in their innovation center, with patience and a consistent strategy and they are starting to become hundred million companies, raising them to become adults who can thrive on their own. However, rebelling is part of growing up.

F

or many, corporate venturing is the process of corporates investing in or acquiring small or start-up companies. You have a much broader view, right?

If you only invest in external companies or VC’s in a separate unit, the company is not learning and we call that one hand clapping (which is pretty silent). You need also to learn how to raise children, even if they were not conceived by yourself and have been adopted. In the same manner as adopted children, newly acquired business units should be fully embraced and integrated into the family.

We define corporate venture as all entrepreneurial activities within a corporate environment, which is indeed much broader. Successful companies are using different corporate venture instruments and in our session we will show you the different flavors of corporate venturing.

I

t seems like every organization should be doing this. Do you agree, and how does that statement relate to reality?

Every company needs to renew itself or it will eventually die. The average lifespan of a company is 12,5 years. Given this lifespan, common knowledge dictates that most of these companies usually fare well on their initial success but soon get overrun because they tried to consolidate their position. To put it differently, a 15-year old needs to be challenged in a different manner than a toddler. Innovation and growth is not a one-time strategy, it only works well if it’s a continues process.

For example; What if Kodak would have bought Instagram? They would still be there under the precondition that they would have changed their behavior. If they would have continued trying to achieve piecemeal improvements, they would not have lasted much longer than they did.

On the contrary, Apple has gone from computers to audio, to phones to tablets, struggle with TV and now talk about cars… The value of a company is determined by the amount and health of its children.

W

hat are you going to cover during your workshop at the Intrapreneurship Conference?

We will show you how you can identify the different members of your innovation family and illuminate why they are different and what drives their behavior. We will explain the dilemmas and give insights that will help the entire innovation family to live harmoniously and prosperously together.

Since we discuss the basics of innovation it is suited for everybody interested in innovation, both for the parents who want to be coached in raising their teenagers as well as for the children who want to learn more about how to deal with their parents. So, we welcome everyone part of the Innovation Family!

Want to join us for Corina & Fred’s Keynote and the rest of the conference?
Click the button below to get your ticket!

Get Your Tickets!


 

The post The Innovation Family – A Basics Guide to Channel Innovative Rebellion appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/the-innovation-family-a-basics-guide-to-channel-innovative-rebellion/feed/ 0
If You Want Innovation, Be Prepared To Change http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/if-you-want-innovation-be-prepared-to-change/ http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/if-you-want-innovation-be-prepared-to-change/#comments Mon, 13 Apr 2015 08:10:34 +0000 http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/?p=3226 There are a few core challenges at the center of any innovative endeavor. Transforming the current business model to one built around talent is one of the most important of these, according to Cris Beswick. It’s about shifting your approach from groups of employees doing a job to teams of passionate ‘intrapreneurs’ collaboratively pursuing a...

Read More

The post If You Want Innovation, Be Prepared To Change appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
Cris Beswick

Cris Beswick

There are a few core challenges at the center of any innovative endeavor. Transforming the current business model to one built around talent is one of the most important of these, according to Cris Beswick. It’s about shifting your approach from groups of employees doing a job to teams of passionate ‘intrapreneurs’ collaboratively pursuing a bold vision. This is a drastic change – but if you really want the result of innovation, change is inevitable.

Originally trained as a product designer, Cris spent over a decade as a successful entrepreneur & CEO building an award-winning design group. After structuring a full exit in 2008 he is now recognized as one of the foremost thought leaders on creating innovative organizations.

We are delighted to have him speak at the Intrapreneurship Conference 2015. Here are few of his thoughts on developing an innovative culture, the holy grail of intrapreneurship.

C

ris, it’s your fundamental belief that every organization can become exceptional by developing its potential to innovate. Why is that?

Innovation has become so much more than just the introduction of a new product. It’s a movement, it’s cultural, it’s an embedded part of an organizations’ DNA. One of the perennial objections to moving towards an innovation culture is that it opens up the organization to chaos. But the reality is that for innovation to thrive there has to be structure.

When innovation becomes more than just a ‘new product development’ pursuit it has the potential to motivate employees across all business units in an organization. Not just acute teams in backroom departments or R&D departments. This potentially changes an organizations’ ability to shape its future, when the right systems are put in place.

I

’ve heard one manager of a big corporation saying that they’ve “now done enough on innovation – let’s get back to doing actual business again”. It seems that statement is at odds with what you’ve just said?

I fear for organizations and individuals who think that innovation is an event, something with a start and end date. In my humble opinion, an organization that treats innovation as a ‘task’ that can be switched on or off, as and when desired is ever more likely to fail at reaching sustainable growth.

The world we now have to operate in isn’t the same as it was a few years ago. Of course we can all blame the financial crisis and the financial institutes that were taking too many risks. An organizations ability to circumnavigate obstacles and/or capitalize on opportunities is what sets the great ones apart from the rest.

A strategic approach to innovation gives organizations the core capability to not just survive but to thrive in the complex, uncertain, shifting world we now operate in and to presume that ‘getting back to business’ is an ok strategy makes the assumption that the world will stay as it is today. Quite frankly, this has never been the case in the past, nor will it be in the future.

F

or many leaders attending the Intrapreneurship Conference, the need for establishing a culture of innovation is clear. They are struggling with how to do that. Your tips?

The desire to build a culture of innovation is always cited by corporate clients but rarely supported with a willingness to change enough. We say the reality is; “many want what innovation delivers but aren’t prepared to do what it takes” and that’s the crux of the matter.

Whilst some of this advice might come naturally, one of the most interesting aspects to me is looking at these cultural trade-offs and link them directly to the behavior and environment required to drive innovative performance.

These include:

  • Openness to mistakes versus zero tolerance
  • Conformity versus challenge
  • Innovation versus control
  • Risk seeking versus risk avoiding
  • Independence versus involvement

So, one of the first things we do with our corporate clients is evaluate how much they are prepared to change in order to find out if the best approach to building innovation capability is going to be internal i.e. cultural.

I’m going to cover some elements of our approach in my keynote but in essence, building a culture of innovation has to be approached holistically. Our experience has shown us that there are core components to innovation that form the building blocks required and it’s the systems thinking approach to those building blocks that makes the difference.

C

an you share an example of where this approach led to the desired results?

We’d never claim our clients are ‘innovative’ solely because of our work. More that through the thought leadership, strategic advice and frameworks we provide, our clients have been given the building blocks to shape their own future through innovation.

As a result, the past several years we’ve used our unique approach and methodology to work with and advise the senior teams of some of the world’s most successful organizations like Cisco, Xchanging, SIG, Roche, QinetiQ, Renault, The Rank Group and the Government of Dubai. All of which are at the top of their game and continuously deliver innovation-led growth.

Every client has a different starting point, challenge and context, so it’s important to remain flexible towards aligning strategic goals with business goals in the short run and over time as well.

W

hy should I want to come and listen to your keynote during the Intrapreneurship Conference?

If building a culture of innovation is a strategic challenge or even a personal goal then in my keynote I’ll outline the eight core building blocks you’ll need to start your journey. These eight core elements are the common denominators shared by the world’s most innovative organizations and will help you form a holistic and strategic roadmap for embedding innovation into your organization.

Want to join us for Cris’ Keynote and the rest of the conference?
Click the button below to get your ticket!

Get Your Tickets!

The post If You Want Innovation, Be Prepared To Change appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/if-you-want-innovation-be-prepared-to-change/feed/ 0
Three unusual stories that almost didn’t happen http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/three-unusual-stories-that-almost-didnt-happen/ http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/three-unusual-stories-that-almost-didnt-happen/#comments Fri, 10 Apr 2015 15:56:56 +0000 http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/?p=3220 n the 90’s, Patrick Naughton, at the time a software developer, recognized that the future of the IT-market was rapidly changing because of decreasing prices for ever more powerful computer chips. The rapidly expanding client base for personal home computers changed market dynamics towards focusing on developing less complex user interfaces and accessibility. He also...

Read More

The post Three unusual stories that almost didn’t happen appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
I

n the 90’s, Patrick Naughton, at the time a software developer, recognized that the future of the IT-market was rapidly changing because of decreasing prices for ever more powerful computer chips. The rapidly expanding client base for personal home computers changed market dynamics towards focusing on developing less complex user interfaces and accessibility.

He also knew that they would have to act fast in order to be the frontrunner in the market. Having almost left the company, the senior staff convinced him to stay and set up a team to develop his ideas. This is what resulted in the creation of the frontrunner of Java, named Oak at the time.

It was clear to Patrick Naughton that entering the market for consumer computers had to be done as soon as possible. Had he left the company, Java as we know it today had never existed. That’s why you should come and listen to Pete Sayburn, who will guide you from post-it to prototype in just 60 minutes in his workshop.

A

t Sony, the then young Ken Kutaragi worked as an electrical engineer in the sound lab. At the time, he bought his daughter a Nintendo. After seeing his daughter play with the console for some time, he realised that the console could perform a lot better if he would integrate a chip solely dedicated to improve the sound. Step by step, he made the console more user-friendly and powerful.

When pitching his ideas on gaming consoles at Sony, he was also working as an outside consultant to Nintendo realising that his electrical improvements had a lot of potential. Common reason, as mentioned above, would suggest that a large company like Sony would be thrilled at finding new potential business opportunities that had not been explored before. On the contrary, Ken’s senior executives threatened to fire him because of being an outside consultant to Nintendo.

The CEO at Sony did recognize the potential of Ken’s innovative endeavours. He decided to keep him as an employee while allowing him to continue his consulting efforts for Nintendo. At Sony, however, they supported him to develop a completely new console, which resulted in the first PlayStation.

Ken’s story is a perfect example of a project that almost did not happen due to the internal corporate culture which did not support his ideas. We can see that bureaucratic corporate mechanisms had almost resulted in Sony never having made the PlayStation.

It is vital to develop a deep understanding of the culture of your organization, and to be pro-active in navigating the political waters from the very early start. Having done this herself successfully as a serial intrapreneur, this is what Sarah Fisher will cover during her workshop this year’s conference.

A

t Unilever, James Inglesby was tasked with discovering new markets for toilet cleaning products. Having all the freedom to do so, James soon realized that there were at the time roughly 2.5 billion people who did not have access to proper sanitation. In this he trothed of the beaten path and decided to create new markets by working together with local social community groups, providing self-contained plastic toilets.

This is but one of Unilever’s now infamous projects combining social goals with market opportunities. Even or maybe especially because trust in big corporates is very low, now is a good moment to include having a social impact in your strategy.

That’s why we’re happy to have Joe Agoada and his team from Ashoka Changemakers joining us in London. In their full-morning workshop, you’ll be equipped with the strategies and tools to implement social intrapreneurship like other leaders in their fields.

As the thee cases above illustrate, speed, trust and values are crucial for every innovation to succeed. Without them, these stories wouldn’t be told today to highlight the importance of embedding intrapreneurship as a core strategy for innovation.

What unusual story is waiting to happen at your organization?
Join us in London and let’s talk about it!

Get Your Tickets!

The post Three unusual stories that almost didn’t happen appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/three-unusual-stories-that-almost-didnt-happen/feed/ 0
Surprise announcement: two more keynotes for you http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/surprise-announcement-two-more-keynotes-for-you/ http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/surprise-announcement-two-more-keynotes-for-you/#comments Thu, 09 Apr 2015 15:26:13 +0000 http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/?p=3215 We’re excited to announce two more keynotes for the 5th edition of the Intrapreneurship Conference, 27-29 May 2015 in London. Stefan Lindegaard and Simon Hill have just confirmed to speak. They said they didn’t want to miss this unique opportunity to meet so many corporate innovators in one room – and we’re sure they bring...

Read More

The post Surprise announcement: two more keynotes for you appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
We’re excited to announce two more keynotes for the 5th edition of the Intrapreneurship Conference, 27-29 May 2015 in London.

Stefan Lindegaard and Simon Hill have just confirmed to speak. They said they didn’t want to miss this unique opportunity to meet so many corporate innovators in one room – and we’re sure they bring a lot of value to your experience.

Two New Keynotes

INNOVATION UPGRADE! – HOW INTRAPRENEURS CAN BOOST THEIR CAREERS AND MAKE THEIR COMPANIES STRONGER

STEFAN LINDEGAARD (Open Innovation)

Stefan Lindegaard is an author, strategic advisor and a trusted source of inspiration to many large corporations, focusing on the topics of open innovation, innovation culture/management and the people side of innovation.

Stefan’s closing keynote covers the state of innovation in 2015, and offers a crash-course for intrapreneurs to become effective change agents. You’ll be inspired and packed with insights to go home and make it happen.

SOFTWARE AND CULTURE AS ENABLERS FOR INTRAPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION

SIMON HILL (Wazoku)

Simon Hill set up leading collaborative innovation software company Wazoku, now regarded as one of the world’s fastest-growing B2B software firms. Alongside his work at Wazoku, Simon is a well-respected author, blogger and speaker on topics relating to collaborative innovation, crowdsourcing, co-creation, intrapreneurship and more.

In his keynote, Simon discusses how organizations such as the BBC, Capita, Aviva and Waitrose have used enabling software and built a supporting culture to drive intrapreneurship and innovation – and how you can do that too.

You can check all speakers, workshop leaders and intrapreneur case studies via our website and the PDF Brochure. The program covers every aspect of intrapreneurship from start to scale, and includes lots of room for sharing and networking. So if you’re serious about innovation, get your ticket today.

It’s like one of your fellow innovators said after she secured her spot – “I didn’t know there’s an event fully dedicated to intrapreneurship. While I have been working in this field for years, only now my company starts to see its relevance. Very much looking forward to sessions and to meeting others in similar positions”.

Get Your Tickets!

If you have any question about the program, the conference or anything, just reply to this email and we’ll get back to you shortly.

See you in London!

The post Surprise announcement: two more keynotes for you appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/surprise-announcement-two-more-keynotes-for-you/feed/ 0
Intrapreneurs in the Public Sector: What can we learn from them? http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/intrapreneurs-in-the-public-sector-what-can-we-learn-from-them/ http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/intrapreneurs-in-the-public-sector-what-can-we-learn-from-them/#comments Thu, 02 Apr 2015 11:05:20 +0000 http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/?p=3182 You might not immediately think of the public sector as one prone to embrace intrapreneurship. But according to Neil Fogarty, that’s probably based on old assumptions. Not that there’s no work to do, but there are some inspiring examples of intrapreneurship and innovation in the public sector and Neil is happy to share his experiences...

Read More

The post Intrapreneurs in the Public Sector: What can we learn from them? appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>

Neil Fogarty

You might not immediately think of the public sector as one prone to embrace intrapreneurship. But according to Neil Fogarty, that’s probably based on old assumptions. Not that there’s no work to do, but there are some inspiring examples of intrapreneurship and innovation in the public sector and Neil is happy to share his experiences with us today.

Neil is managing director of the international consultancy Spark Global Business, the socio-economic development company SEEA, adviser to business incubators and accelerators and a published author/speaker. In his upcoming book, he will cover Public Sector Innovation.

N

eil, you’ll publish a book on public sector innovation shortly. Why are you passionate about this topic?

Spark is a family-owned business with intentions to pass the business on to our children.  So this begs the question, “what kind of world will our children inherit?”  We want to leave a legacy for our family and firmly believe that we can achieve this by working with the public sector – helping them to become more commercially-minded without becoming a commercial entity: becoming self-sufficient and retaining their public spirit in a time of diminishing public funding.

C

an you share with us a few key points from the book?

I am co-authoring the book with a public sector professional – bringing together our private and public sector experiences as we explore for example the rising demands of the general public ageing population, fuel poverty, general demand for services, etc. at a time when funding is being aggressively reduced.

You only need to take a look at the biting austerity measures in the UK, or the civil unrest in Greece to see that we live in straitened times as governments seek to ‘ balance the books’.  The book looks at how a public body can develop a functioning (and successful) intrapreneurial environment to generate revenue, exceed customer expectations, derive efficacy as well as efficiency in the organization and to also re-engage, re-focus and re-enthuse a disenfranchised workforce.

In the book, we refer to design thinking, system thinking, leadership development, employee engagement… a toolkit that we have used many times with our clients over the years.  One of the key points is the development of the Spark Intrapreneur Ecosystem Model to accommodate the wider political aspects of a public sector intrapreneur.

H

ow is innovation in the public sector different to innovation in the private sector? Does the same apply to intrapreneurship?

I would suggest that innovation in the public sector is the hardest of all:

The private sector has a foundation in entrepreneurship – any organization tends to start because an entrepreneur has taken a leap of faith and embraced the risk.  Similarly, NGOs, charities and foundations, have private sector influences (philanthropists, benefactors, volunteers) that seek to deliver more-with-less as they don’t have large central government grants to support them.

Public sector organisations such as central government departments, local government (councils), the nationalised health services, the emergency services (fire, police, ambulance) are built upon receiving grants (taxation, subsidies, etc.), long-established structures, entrenched cultures, policies & processes (that may no longer even be fit for purpose) and so on.

Tied closely into dealing with the lack of agility are the politics – the office politician seeking to protect their career path, and the Politician with a vested interest based upon party allegiance.  What we also see are the local Politicians with their own agenda. The public sector intrapreneur deals with a vast amount of complexity that the private sector intrapreneur does not see.

I

n your experience, what makes or breaks public sector intrapreneurship?

This is a very simple question that will probably lead to Spark developing a two-day workshop on the topic!  Where to begin?

  • leaders who pay lip service to the concept but don’t follow through;
  • the reluctance to give people time to develop their idea;
  • the public sector desire to always come up with a solution (even when the issue isn’t fully understood); the ideological fight in the public sector between ‘public service’ and ‘commercial thinking’;
  • managers protecting their domains to the detriment of the organization (and the general public);
  • the public sector ability to make the simplest issue sound the most complicated;
  • the length of time it takes to get the simplest decision cleared (management teams, leadership teams, scrutiny committees, council member consultation…. and then start over again).

So, what makes or breaks public sector intrapreneurship?  The public sector!

W

hy should I join your session during the Intrapreneurship Conference 2015?

There are many reasons… this is a chance to meet with people from different parts of the public sector (both in terms of discipline as well as where they are in the world).

In addition, the workshop will be looking at some of the make-or-break issues mentioned above as well as a framework to enable public sector intrapreneurs.  It’s important to realise that if you work in any kind of regulated industry / sector, there will always be people with ‘reasons’ why things can’t be done… so the smart intrapreneur develops strategies to get things done.

If you aren’t interested in creating new and invigorating ways of working, go sightseeing in London instead.

Want to join us for Neil’s Keynote and the rest of the conference?
Click the button below to get your ticket!

Get Your Tickets!


Image by Rob Thomas @psinnovate

The post Intrapreneurs in the Public Sector: What can we learn from them? appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/intrapreneurs-in-the-public-sector-what-can-we-learn-from-them/feed/ 0
Intrapreneurs and managers: communicate to innovate http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/intrapreneurs-and-managers-communicate-to-innovate/ http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/intrapreneurs-and-managers-communicate-to-innovate/#comments Wed, 01 Apr 2015 10:58:54 +0000 http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/?p=3179 Miscommunication between managers and intrapreneurs is one of the major reasons why innovation doesn’t happen. In fact, some might argue they are natural enemies of each other and of the innovation process in general. But according to Anne, that’s not true anymore. By connecting managers and intrapreneurs, and facilitating proper communication, innovation success is doable....

Read More

The post Intrapreneurs and managers: communicate to innovate appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>

Anne Chanard

Miscommunication between managers and intrapreneurs is one of the major reasons why innovation doesn’t happen. In fact, some might argue they are natural enemies of each other and of the innovation process in general. But according to Anne, that’s not true anymore. By connecting managers and intrapreneurs, and facilitating proper communication, innovation success is doable.

As marketing director in IT and high tech companies, Anne Chanard has led several large projects in product development and in each of them, she set the mission of breaking silos and bringing teams together. Anne has interviewed many intrapreneurs and innovation managers for her thesis, and prior to her session at the Intrapreneurship Conference, we asked her about her findings.

A

nne, you have done a deep dive in intrapreneurship last year. What was your most remarkable finding?

When I started my MBA thesis on Innovation and intrapreneurship in large companies, I embarked my research from the assumption that intrapreneurial forces were strong in organizations. Intrapreneurs seem to be present potentially everywhere and the models that support them are clearly working.

W

ould you share an approach to embedding intrapreneurship that worked well for that particular company?

When I interviewed Alexandre Dandan and Pierre Saulnier, they referred to Darwin to qualify Poult’s approach to intrapreneurship. Meaning that projects carried by intrapreneurs live and die based on their attractiveness to the group. This is some kind of natural selection in fact.

The same principle applies with IBM’s crowdsourcing platform. Intrapreneurs submit projects via the platform; they are potentially tested by the community of 150.000 IBM’ers. After this first selection, employees have the possibility to fund projects, via a crowdfunding platform.

I believe that this crowdsourcing / crowdfunding system is more efficient and allows for faster, more accurate decision-making than the traditional top-down model because the adopters can post proof of a concept’s value.

Y

our view on finding intrapreneurial eagerness is omnipresent is very interesting. Could you expand on what (successful) intrapreneurs have in common?

That is exactly what we will be trying to find out at our workshop. How to identify potential Intrapreneurs? I plan on identifying 2 teams within the group; the Intrapreneurs and the managers. Next, I will ask the question to both group and see where their views overlap. Interesting exercise, isn’t it?

My views are that intrapreneurial talent requires a good dose of optimism and communication skills, plus a lot of work. Working on different projects at the same time, with people from diverse skills and competencies is also a good sign: it multiplies the sources of inspiration and potentially increases the quality of innovative ideas.

W

hat are the key characteristics of an intrapreneur?

In my thesis I describe the intrapreneur first as loyal to his or her company; they don’t wake up each morning thinking of how they could leave the company and start a business on their own.

On that, Corinne Jouanny, head of Altran Innovation business group comments:

Being an entrepreneur within a large organization is like wearing an exoskeleton.

This image is quite accurate: in a large organization, the competencies and resources you can tap into are almost endless, and intrapreneurs recognize that.

And for sure, intrapreneurs have a strong network within their organization. They are agile, they connect people, and also ideas together. Usually they like to work on multiple projects; this is how they come up with “out-of-the-box” ideas.

W

here do you see intrapreneurship developing this year?

Potentially in all sectors! From a management perspective, developing a framework that supports intrapreneurial activity highly depends on the organization’s attitude towards risk. Now there are areas where I see more difficulties, such as medicine or vaccine development. These sectors are by nature risk averse exactly because the environments have high potential risks due to long product development cycles.

F

rom your experience interviewing intrapreneurs, will companies increasingly start to adopt policies that support intrapreneurial activity?

Let me tell you a story. I went to the Alcatel Lucent “Innovation days” in their R&D center in France. Bell Labs researchers presented innovative projects in wireless, cloud and data processing technologies. Some engineers presented merely the technological aspects. Others were not only good at describing the technology, they also could tell about market opportunities and use case scenarios. There are high chances, I thought, that these guys had been through the Intrapreneurship Program that Olivier Leclerc, head of innovation, had put in place.

They had tested their solution with customers, defended their projects in front of an executive committee, up to the business plan and sometimes beyond that. Now, which profile do you think is more interesting for companies? I am convinced that it is in a company’s best interest to foster entrepreneurial talent at all levels of the organization. At R&D level of course, but also sales, marketing, production, quality management.

W

hat, in your view, are the three most important drivers or motivations for intrapreneurs to pursue their ideas?

First, I’m convinced that the intrapreneurs pursue an idea when and only when they are totally convinced they will succeed. They are able to adapt, learn from mistakes, but they will stick to the overall direction and show great tenacity and drive.

And they don’t work on their own. They like to connect people, customers, partners, and also people with different skills within the organization. That way they create a project team, because they have a great network, within and outside the organization.

And why are they doing that? Because they are convinced that the organization is not fully in sync with the customers anymore, or that the organization could do better. It almost always starts from customer’s point of view. “I like the idea of bringing something additional to my company” is something I heard, “We need to re-think, re-enthrall customer experience”. They are more “achievement” than “power-motivated”.

W

hat do you want to learn at the conference and who do you like to meet?

I am driven by curiosity, so my goal is to meet everyone! Being a small, fast paced community, it should be possible to meet everybody in 3 days. The attendees of the 2014 Intrapreneurship conference in Eindhoven have brought me a lot of inspiration while working on my thesis. This is the momentum, the drive I’m looking for.

Also, I was quite thrilled by the un-conference sessions on the last day of the conference. Intrapreneurship is exactly that: being in charge of the agenda, identifying the important topics and driving them forward to real world achievements. See you in London!

Want to join us for Anne’s Workshop and the rest of the conference?
Click the button below to get your ticket!

Get Your Tickets!

 

 

The post Intrapreneurs and managers: communicate to innovate appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/intrapreneurs-and-managers-communicate-to-innovate/feed/ 0
The seven dragons of Intrapreneurship (and something about the Beatles) http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/the-seven-dragons-of-intrapreneurship-and-something-about-the-beatles/ http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/the-seven-dragons-of-intrapreneurship-and-something-about-the-beatles/#comments Sat, 28 Mar 2015 04:14:48 +0000 http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/?p=3168 You don’t often come across people who think sales are best done on a beermat – and who have a passion for the Beatles. It might seem like an odd combination, but when speaking with Mike Southon, we found out why these two combine very well in the context of intrapreneurship. We will not yet...

Read More

The post The seven dragons of Intrapreneurship (and something about the Beatles) appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>

Mike Southon

You don’t often come across people who think sales are best done on a beermat – and who have a passion for the Beatles. It might seem like an odd combination, but when speaking with Mike Southon, we found out why these two combine very well in the context of intrapreneurship.

We will not yet tell you the details of the result of this mix – for that, come to see Mike on Wednesday evening during the Intrapreneurship Conference. But we did ask Mike to share with us some of his experiences and insights already.

Mike, as a serial entrepreneur, how come you’re interested in intrapreneurship?

Large company entrepreneurship (or ‘intrapreneurship’) is just as important for the economy as helping people start businesses. Actually, I sometimes envy intrapreneurs because they can often be more effective than entrepreneurs. Due to the resources and expertise that large organisations can deploy, they can be more apt to tackle business.

T

ell us about the dragons you’ve identified, they seem to be quite an important element in your book.

That’s right! In our book, ‘The Boardroom Entrepreneur’, my co-author Chris West and I identified several classes of people who have the capacity to stifle your innovative efforts altogether.

  • Clever Nay-Sayers: people who encourage a culture of ‘clever negativity’
  • Green-Eyed Monsters: people jealous of the fun that intrapreneurs might be having when working on new projects
  • Former Nay-Sayers: people who claimed that an idea had been tried, but failed before
  • Cart Horses: people who  would rather work on existing, often more predictable projects
  • Short-Termists: people who try and kill an idea if it doesn’t bring instant measurable success
  • Rescuers: well-meaning but ineffectual people who claim to want to help, but just get in the way
  • The Brand Police: people who claim new ideas are not what the company has always done successfully for many years, or would damage the company’s perceived positioning in the marketplace
  • Over-Eager Suits: people keen to apply invasive consultants on a new project, ostensibly to reduce risk, but which result in innovation being stifled.

Perhaps, the term dragon comes from Mike’s view on Dragon’s Den:

“it is a grotesque parody of how the process of starting a business actually works, as much to do with real entrepreneurship as Pop Idol or The…X Factor have to do with The Beatles.”

By and large, the first thing is to not try to fight the dragons. Actually, the best thing to do is doing the exact opposite; win them over once your idea is proven. They can potentially provide complementary skills, personalities and outlooks whilst halving the start-up costs, workload and pressure.

“Lennon & McCartney, Jagger & Richards and Kermit & Miss Piggy: what do they all have in common? Well aside from (bizarrely) all scoring number-one albums, they are excellent examples of diametrically different characters forming hugely successful partnerships. All three have also proved very lucrative businesses; and in business, partnerships are good.”

To be more exact, when you make sure that these people cannot avoid seeing the brilliance of your idea, it might turn out that it are exactly these people who try to get on your side. A common denominator for all the above mentioned aversive people is that they are afraid of missing out!

W

hat’s the importance of sponsors in this process?

By working together with your internal Mentor or Sponsor you are aided by steering through the corporate landscape and make sure your ideas stay on track.

He or she should be prepared to discuss your new ideas, both in and outside the company. If you have an entrepreneurial idea, he or she can suggest that if it does not work out, you can always come back, better for having tried. They might even suggest that the company be the first customer for your products, a win for both parties, which has bootstrapped many an early-stage entrepreneur.

I was discussing mentoring with René Carayol, the speaker and leadership expert, whose television credits include the series Pay Off Your Mortgage in Two Years. His business career has mostly been in large companies, and he still speaks fondly about his first break at Marks & Spencer, where his mentor was the group IT director.

Mentors will stop you making elementary mistakes, René told me. They will have contacts which may be worth more than their weight in gold, plus they will have insights into the flaws in your character that you will be able to address by putting together the right team. They are hugely valuable. “My mentor pulls no punches. He’s direct and to the point, tough and explicit”.

W

hen and how should intrapreneurs better behave like entrepreneurs?

At all times, except being very mindful of the internal processes of the large organisation: only asking for forgiveness, rather than permission, while not upsetting too many people too early on in the process.

I

s that what you’re going to share with us during the Intrapreneurship Conference?

Yes indeed!

Over the last ten years, I have carefully developed the techniques required to bypass the ‘Dragons’, where necessary, if only for a limited period of time. If you are a large organisation looking to be more ‘intrapreneurial, I would be pleased to share these techniques with you. And as you mention in the beginning of this interview, it will be a completely different experience than your regular presentation. Will be great fun!

Want to join us for Mike’s Keynote and the rest of the conference?
Click the button below to get your ticket!

Get Your Tickets!

The post The seven dragons of Intrapreneurship (and something about the Beatles) appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/the-seven-dragons-of-intrapreneurship-and-something-about-the-beatles/feed/ 0
last call for Early birds and 12 new sessions announced http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/last-call-for-early-birds-and-12-new-sessions-announced/ http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/last-call-for-early-birds-and-12-new-sessions-announced/#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2015 15:28:41 +0000 http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/?p=3130 Intrapreneurship, is that corporates trying to innovate like startups? Is that establishing an entrepreneurial culture? Or is is a name for what those few entrepreneurial corporate folks do inside big organizations? We think it’s all of the above . Moreover, it’s relevant for any organization, regardless of size or sector, industry or history. Like Gary...

Read More

The post last call for Early birds and 12 new sessions announced appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
Intrapreneurship, is that corporates trying to innovate like startups? Is that establishing an entrepreneurial culture? Or is is a name for what those few entrepreneurial corporate folks do inside big organizations?

We think it’s all of the above . Moreover, it’s relevant for any organization, regardless of size or sector, industry or history. Like Gary Stewart, director of Wayra, puts it – everyone is trying to be the next Apple, not the next Kodak.

But how do you do that?

Industry leading organizations like Philips, Ernst & Young, Deutsche Telekom, Airbus, Vodafone, Oracle, BBVA, Heineken, BNP Paribas, Grundfos, Accenture, Boehringer Ingelheim and Alcatel-Lucent have attended the Intrapreneurship Conference to get the best and next practicies for implementing and leveraging intrapreneurship.

Join them and many other peers for 2,5 days of learning and networking (27 – 29 May), in the vibrant city of London.

You have until April 1st to benefit from the reduced price of the early bird tickets. You can download the whole program as a PDF file here.

Here’s the last update on the program, announcing four keynotes, four more workshops and four more case studies.

Four Keynotes

Cris Beswick

BUILDING AN INTREPRENEUR-DRIVEN CULTURE OF INNOVATION

CRIS BESWICK (Future Shapers)

In a fast paced keynote Cris Beswick will share his insights on what it takes to build a culture of innovation and how intrepreneurs can be the driving force behind shaping their organisations future and winning at the new game.

YES YOU CAN (MEASURE THE PERFORMANCE OF YOUR INNOVATION)

VIDAR ANDERSEN (Blacktar)
We know corporations need new key performance indicators and new scalable tools to track and measure the performance of innovation. But what do they look like?

WELCOME TO WAYRA – WHY AND HOW TELEFONICA LAUNCHED WAYRA TO ACCELERATE INNOVATION

GARY STEWART (Wayra)
Gary will discuss the challenges and opportunities that corporates have in staying relevant via open innovation and intrapreneurship initiatives, using Telefonica’s experience with Wayra and Open Future as case studies.

HOW TO CREATE A FUTURE-PROOF ORGANIZATION

JORIS VAN HEUKELOM (MakerStreet)

There is not one reason why corporates couldn’t achieve what startups do. Any company can be put in shape to be the next winner. After helping big corporates innovate like startups for the last 4 years, Joris will share the model for corporate innovation that works.

 

Four more workshops

SPACE TO INNOVATE: HOW MINDFULNESS UNLOCKS INTRAPRENEURSHIP POTENTIAL

JEROEN JANSS (AmWell)

During this experiential workshop, you will discover how mindfulness enables not just creativity but also focus, clarity and resilience and experience how mindfulness changes the way innovation is done at leading companies.

THINK WITH YOUR HANDS: HOW TO ACTIVATE WHOLE-BRAIN THINKING ABOUT TREND INSIGHTS AND WEAK SIGNALS

KATE HAMMER (KILNCO)
The scaffolding KILN provides just enough for people to make meaning, but not so much it stifles imagination. Our tools include espresso-sized glugs of insights, three-dimensional objects, sharpies, round tables, small groups working out loud and in silence. A creativity blast you can do in your work clothes.

 

HOW TO HAVE AN ABUNDANCE OF IDEAS

MICHAEL ALLEN (TalkFreely)

In his fun and engaging presentation, Michael will explain his unique view of what it takes to have an abundance of ideas, why he (and everyone) should share them freely.

CORPORATE PARENTS: HOW TO DEAL WITH TEENAGE VENTURES

CORINA KUIPER & FRED VAN OMMEN (Innovation Family)

Starting new business is relatively easy, however turning these babies into successful grown-ups is not. This workshop helps you deal with the tension between corporate parents and entrepreneurial children.

 

Four more case studies

THE CHALLENGES OF COLLABORATING WITH STARTUPS TO FOSTER INNOVATION

LARS SCHMIDT (ESRI)

Lars will share key learnings from having attracted and collaborated with over 150 startups over the past 3 years to develop new use cases for Esri software product.

WHAT I’VE LEARNED FROM 100 SUCCESSFUL INTRAPRENEURS

DAN TAYLOR (Market Gravity)
In a clear and punchy way, Dan will bring to life the challenges of corporate innovation and shares the secrets of successful intrapreneurs, based on 100 case studies from his new book “The Secrets of Big Business Innovation”.

 

WHY MEDIA CAN’T INNOVATE WITHOUT INTRAPRENEURS 

ASTRID SANDOVAL (The Guardian)
Astrid has over twenty years experience working in the ever-changing and dynamic media space. She works at the intersection of innovation, storytelling and technology.

FAST-FORWARD- INTRAPRENEURSHIP IN TRANSPORTATION

OLIVIER REITZ (GE Transportation)

Olivier started in 2010 with a team of 10 – built a 30 million Euro business with a team of 80 people today. How did he do that?

 

SO what’s your choice? The next Apple or the next Kodak?

Join us in London for 25+ sessions with the best group of intrapreneurs and experts we’ve ever featured. The number of seats is limited on purpose to create the best atmosphere for honest sharing (no bullshit bingo), impactful learning and effective networking.

The Early Bird Ticket Rate applies till April 1st (no joke), as of today, you have 5 days left !

Get Your Tickets!

 

The post last call for Early birds and 12 new sessions announced appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/last-call-for-early-birds-and-12-new-sessions-announced/feed/ 0
Defying Gravity: from Concept to Prototype in 60 minutes http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/defying-gravity-from-concept-to-prototype-in-60-minutes/ http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/defying-gravity-from-concept-to-prototype-in-60-minutes/#comments Tue, 24 Mar 2015 21:26:00 +0000 http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/?p=3082 The best innovation comes from the fusion of three disciplines (insight, commerciality and design). While it doesn’t always make life easy, a team of people who bring these different skills can achieve amazing results – but the most importanct factor to leverage is speed. In our interview, Pete Sayburn explained to us why innovation is...

Read More

The post Defying Gravity: from Concept to Prototype in 60 minutes appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>

Peter Sayburn

The best innovation comes from the fusion of three disciplines (insight, commerciality and design). While it doesn’t always make life easy, a team of people who bring these different skills can achieve amazing results – but the most importanct factor to leverage is speed. In our interview, Pete Sayburn explained to us why innovation is a high paced endeavour and why it will most likely fail if it isn’t.

Pete is co-founder and CEO at Market Gravity and one of our keynote speakers and workshop leaders. Furthermore, he is also a co-author of the business novel Defying Gravity.

P

ete, you are able to get companies to innovate faster. What is your magic trick?

The key to rapid innovation in big companies is confidence. Introducing new products or entering new markets feels pretty scary, so anything you can do to raise the level of confidence improves your chances of success. At Market Gravity, we do three things to give companies the confidence to launch new propositions:

  • First is prototyping – to demonstrate what it will be like to use the new product of service, and to show how potential customers react to the idea.
  • The second way is via the commercial case. The prototype and visualisation will provide the emotional rationale, but you still need to “show me the money!” Costumers in the early stage of innovation are not just valuable for testing; they can provide huge amounts of feedback – if they are engaged in the process.
  • The third element is engagement; you have to take the key people in the business with you. We keep the team size small, but we involve the managers who will ultimately own the new innovation throughout the design process, building ownership and incorporating their operational knowledge into the launch plan.

W

hy is it important to innovate faster in the first place?

Speed is the number one weapon in the innovator’s arsenal. It overcomes most of the causes of what we call “innovation death” in big companies. Without speed you risk missing the market opportunity and you can get stuck in that horrible cycle of corporate inertia, appearing at countless investment committees, but always coming away empty handed, promising to return next month with the answers to another round of pointless questions!

S

o it’s all about staying ahead of the masses?

Exactly! By moving fast, you have a chance to prove the market opportunity before everyone notices, you beat your competitors to the punch, and you learn so much more via iteration and market testing.

I

n your experience, what makes or breaks success of these innovation efforts?

There are several causes of innovation death in big companies and many are accidental. The single biggest cause in my experience is continuity of ownership. A great innovation is often reliant on a single sponsor or cheerleader and when these people change jobs or leave the company, great ideas are side-lined. Internalizing sponsorship within your company and getting an idea to gain traction fast are thus again highly important to successful intrapreneurial activities.

One success story is BTSport – the media offering from the UK’s largest telecoms company. It took almost 10 years from initial concept to full-scale market impact. But it had a consistent guardian in Gavin Patterson, initially head of the consumer division and now Group CEO. BT is now a credible competitor to Sky in the Pay-TV market.

S

ome companies try to copy startups and methods startups use to grow. What’s wise and what’s not that wise about that approach?

Big companies can gain a huge amount by adopting a more entrepreneurial mind-set and thinking like a startup. It makes them more customer-driven, with a single-minded and clear purpose. It also values action over strategy, getting into the market and learning from experience, rather than talking too much!

Finally, a focus on cost efficiency and how to make the best use of scarce resources keeps the team focused on what matters most. The other side of this is a risk of isolation. By standing apart from the core business, a new innovation might fail to take advantage of the wonderful assets and resources that a big company can provide.

Y

our firm organizes the Corporate Entrepreneur Awards. If you look to the past winners, what differentiates them from others?

Actually, the answer to that question is simpler than you would expect! It boils down to just one thing; the team. All the successful entries had wonderful team spirit, positive culture and shared enthusiasm to make the project succeed. It takes a huge amount of dedication, resilience, hard work and passion to be an Intrapreneur, so sharing this experience with a group of like-minded people seems to be the key to success.

B

y the way, we sometimes get confused ourselves; ­ is there a difference between a corporate entrepreneur and an intrapreneur?

I see the terms as pretty interchangeable – the most important thing is to recognise that there are highly entrepreneurial people in big established companies as well as startups and high-growth ventures. They make a very positive contribution to the world and I am delighted to see their efforts recognised and celebrated. That’s one of the main reasons to go the Intrapreneurship Conference, by the way!

S

houldn’t all employees be intrapreneurial?

There are always better ways of doing things and innovation should be valued in all roles, but I see the role of the Intrapreneur as something different. This is more about doing better things, and doing things better. It involves a level of uncertainty and experimentation than most companies (and their customers for that matter) couldn’t handle in many core business functions.

Big companies are very good at applying a consistent process to a well understood task or challenge at huge scale. The Intrapreneur’s role is to take the company into new areas, less well understood – to be the pioneer.

W

hy should I join your workshop during the conference?

We usually take around 60 days to drive a new idea from concept to prototype within a big company. We use some pretty interesting methods, tools and approaches and we take dozens of people on the journey. But 60 days still feels fast…believe me! In this workshop, we will be taking that journey in 60 minutes! So fasten your seat belts and enjoy the experience…

More info about Pete’s workshop

The post Defying Gravity: from Concept to Prototype in 60 minutes appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/defying-gravity-from-concept-to-prototype-in-60-minutes/feed/ 0
What makes social intrapreneurs the “most valuable” employees? http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/what-makes-social-intrapreneurs-the-most-valuable-employees/ http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/what-makes-social-intrapreneurs-the-most-valuable-employees/#comments Mon, 23 Mar 2015 14:10:24 +0000 http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/?p=3076 When you talk about social intrapreneurship, you probably talk either with or about Joe Agoada. Joseph (just call him Joe) is a passionate innovator focused on supporting organizations to do well while doing good. He has over nine years working in complex international programs and partnerships, and he will be hosting an exclusive full-morning session on...

Read More

The post What makes social intrapreneurs the “most valuable” employees? appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
Joseph Agoada

Joseph Agoada

When you talk about social intrapreneurship, you probably talk either with or about Joe Agoada. Joseph (just call him Joe) is a passionate innovator focused on supporting organizations to do well while doing good. He has over nine years working in complex international programs and partnerships, and he will be hosting an exclusive full-morning session on social intrapreneurship during the 5th Intrapreneurship Conference on Friday, the 29th of May. We sat down with him to discuss what makes social intrapreneurs the “most valuable” employees in a company. 

J

oe, we welcomed you on stage during the Intrapreneurship Conference 2013. What have you been up to since then?

The 2013 Intrapreneurship Conference in Barcelona was a special moment for me. Sitting on stage next to Gib Bulloch (executive Director at Accenture Development Partnerships) and sharing my social intrapreneurship journey publicly for the first time turned out to be a pivotal moment.

Right after that conference I left UNICEF, which was a very difficult decision. I took an opportunity to teach an online course on social intrapreneurship with Ashoka. The participants in the course were absolutely amazing and their excitement and engagement was really motivating.

I learned a lot through that experience! Since then I’ve been doing a lot of knowledge, partnerships, communication and other strategic work around social intrapreneurship.

W

hat are you currently working on related to social intrapreneurship?

I’ve continued facilitating social intrapreneurship online courses with the Ashoka network with a diverse group from around the world, over 30 different countries already.  I’m doing a series of fun in-person social intrapreneurship startegy workshops with an up-and-coming education company, General Assembly.

In 2014 I also started advising the global communication function at a Silicon Valley based non-profit organization called InSTEDD (Innovative Support to Emergencies Disease and Disasters). InSTEDD co-creates solutions for tough humanitarian challenges such as disease outbreaks in low resource communities.

They support large institutions like the CDC and Red Cross to improve their efficiency and impact through technology and applying lean and agile design approaches. Supporting InSTEDD’s work and being an active member of Ashoka’s network has kept me at the forefront of intrapreneurial tactics for social innovation.

L

ast year, you labelled social intrapreneurs to be any organization’s most valuable employees. What made you say so?

A social intrapreneur brings incredible value to their organization! They bring benefits and innovation to the company but also impact society positively. I find other social intrapreneurs I meet to be insightful, humble, and empathetic.

They are passionate, love what they do, and spread that around the workplace, they can make great colleagues and partners in co-creation. At the same time I’ve seen many organizations overlook or ignore the value of their (social) intrapreneurs. I wrote the article, and gave them the most valuable title to explore their potential and raise awareness of how important they are to the company and society.

Y

ou have now supported a number of organizations with social intrapreneurship programs. What in your experience is the common denominator for success?

I don’t know if there is one common denominator for success, really. However, having an ecosystem of social intrapreneurship opportunities within the organization helps to create an enabling culture and paths for advancement. If your organization has only a few options to support intrapreneurs, it can leave out a lot of employees who may not be motivated to be the risk taking intrapreneur but would support their projects if they had lower intensity ways to engage and support in the projects. Without a support system around them, even the best intrapreneurs are set-up to fail.

S

o, in that sense, social intrapreneurship is just or at least, also, a strategy for increasing employee engagement?

Yes! I have seen this very deeply in my engagement with Boehringer Ingelheim, who were big supporters of the last version of the Ashoka social intrapreneurship course. A number of their employees were participants, and through their engagement with intrapreneurs from other companies, non-profits and even social entrepreneurs from around the world, they became activated to engage with other ecosystem opportunities that their company was offering.

F

or us it’s great to welcome Ashoka Changemakers as a partner for the event. Why did they want to become a partner?

Ashoka Changemakers was a founding member of the League of Intrapreneurs Competition which Accenture and others, which ran in 2012. From that event, Ashoka has watched a movement slowly grow. The organization recently has renewed its commitment to supporting social intrapreneurship, and they’ve witnessed an increased willingness among corporates to support employees in social innovation. The Intrapreneurship Conference is a great place to convene and bring together networks interested in the intrapreneurship topic.

W

hat are you going to cover in your workshop during the Intrapreneurship Conference 2015 in London?

I have been running a day long workshop on social intrapreneurship strategy at General Assembly. We will take some highlights from that agenda for our workshop (which you can check out here). More news shortly!

W

hat things are you looking forward to in terms of social intrapreneurship in 2015?

I believe there will be a lot of growth for the social intrapreneurship community this year. In the first few months I’ve been contacted about social intrapreneurship from corporates, non-profits and governments alike. This is the year that social intrapreneurship is going to gain a lot of momentum the United States. There seems to be a more developed community in Europe but it is picking up more and more interest in the states.

I hope to welcome many social intrapreneurs for our first conference in the US this fall!

More info about Joe’s workshop

The post What makes social intrapreneurs the “most valuable” employees? appeared first on Intrapreneurship Conference 2015.

]]>
http://www.intrapreneurshipconference.com/what-makes-social-intrapreneurs-the-most-valuable-employees/feed/ 0